Posts Tagged ‘Green Court’

Malaysia Launches GREEN COURTS, Takes Global Leadership Role on Environmental Crime

Wednesday, September 12th, 2012

Everyone knows that wildlife law enforcement around the world is terribly underfunded and that hardly any wildlife traffickers ever go to jail.  In The Lizard King, the very motivated Agent Chip Bepler couldn’t get federal prosecutors to take his endangered species cases when they had the NY mafia’s John Gotti to go after. 

I have said it before, but one of my discoveries while researching The Lizard King was that historically the most important innovation in wildlife law enforcement was not more money or more cops, but a committed court.  Perhaps the key step a country can take to reduce environmental crime is to separate environmental prosecutions from other forms of crime. When the US Department of Justice did this it revolutionized wildlife and environmental prosecutions in the US.   Today’s Environmental and Natural Resources Division enables federal wildlife and environmental investigators to take their cases directly to a knowledgeable prosecutor, who can help push a case forward.   In The Lizard King, AUSA Chris McAlilley created a mini-version of the ENRD in the Miami office of the Justice Department and that move ended up key to sending Mike Van Nostrand to prison.

And so it is with this background one should consider this news from Malaysia this week:  “The Environmental Court set up by the judiciary on Sept 3 will start operations on Monday.”  Malaysia is launching Green Courts!   Here is the full story in The Star

And lest anyone forget, this effort to create a green court rises in large part from the voice of  Azrina Abdullah, who called for a green court in her editorial November 2010.  The voice of committed individuals can make a difference around the world.  It takes passion and brains, and Azrina Abdullah has both.

 

Reaction to Wong Release

Thursday, February 23rd, 2012

 

I confess, my initial reaction to Anson Wong’s release yesterday was that of a lawyer:  the court’s decision to reduce Wong’s sentence was probably reasonable given the facts as presented.

Here is excellent and insightful commentary from Malaysia on the implications of Anson Wong’s release from Dr. Bill Schaedla of TRAFFIC SE Asia who correctly points out that there is more to the story than simply what reached the appellate court… 

The investigation and prosecution of this case also lends further support for Malaysia’s efforts to create a Green Court.

Reaction from www.nkkhoo.com